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Wham-O 50 Mold—Black, Gold—Unpigmented

Maker: Wham-O
Model: 141G
Style:
Mold: 50
Size:
Disc Color: Unpigmented
Lettering/Hot Stamp: 1976 National Championship Series—Gold, Black
Label/Sticker:
Date Introduced: 1976
Number Produced: 25
Period of Manufacture:
Special Notes: For some reason, the 50 mold with a black hot stamp was not created in mass like the other colors of 40 and 50 molds in the 1976 NAS series. There was an Ad in the May/June issue of the 1977 issue of Frisbee World that said "SPECIAL COLLECTOR'S RUN: A once only run of 25, 141 Black Jimmies. No more ever to be produced. Orders filled as received. Proceeds will be used for Series equipment. No more than two discs to an individual. $20 each *plus 25ct handling per disc." No one knows for sure if it was an oversight by the IFA/Wham-O of this was intentionally done to stoke collectors.
The following information is from a article in the May/Jun 1977 issue of Frisbee World written by Flash Eberle. The highlights were added by the FDM. “A great many developments occurred between the lapse of the 1975 tournament season and the beginning of the 1976 season. The former tournament circuit had evolved into a National Championship Series of events. Players could earn Series points in the sanctioned tournaments in order to qualify for the Rose Bowl. Along with the new Series point system came a newly organized format for tournament discs. It was called the Tournament Series Frisbee. The concept simply involved providing two standard type discs which could be made available at all of the Series events. Simple in theory? Yes. Simple for collecting? No! Par usual, the championship Series discs for 1976 involved quite a few different quirks and oddities complicating the collecting pastimes of Frisbee fanatics. Some of the peculiarities involved colors, molds and numbers of discs produced. Before discussing the individual tournament discs, it is important to mention that the '76 series discs are affectionately called " Jimmies", or the "Jimmy series". The reason is simply that a very agile 19-year-old from Somerville, N.J. by the name of Jim Scala is depicted on every championship Series disc, with the exception of two. He is seen making a leaping between-the-legs follow catch. This made for an extremely attractive Frisbee. It was also a milestone in Frisbee history: the first time a picture of a player had ever been hot stamped onto the face of a Frisbee. The first tournament of the season offered a yellow mold 40 119-G with Jimmy in black on a gold hot-stamped background. The Santa Barbara disc certainly started the season off on the right foot. The three colored hot stamped 40 became popular with players for its weight and stability, especially for M.T.A. The second tournament of the championship Series also made available a special tournament Frisbee® with two people hot stamped on the top. Vaughn Frick and John Sappington, of Humbly fame, are featured doing a spectacular throw and catch routine. The yellow with blue hot stamping Ann Arbor Frisbee possessed an added trait which defined the character of the disc. A new mold had been developed for the 119-G and its debut was in the form of the Ann Arbor disc. A very interesting incident happened while the 41's were being distributed to the entrants at the registration area. It was discovered that some of the discs were in fact mold 40's! All distribution activities were momentarily halted until an inventory could be taken. It was determined that out of a couple of hundred 41's that were issued to the event, only a dozen or so 40's were found. This makes the Ann Arbor 40 an extremely rare and valuable disc for collectors. Thirteen more events were to follow the two opening tournaments in March. Both the 119's and 141's were unpigmented discs with a gold hot-stamped inscription of the "76 National Championship Series" and the International Frisbee Association. This marked the first availability of unpigmented discs to players. The colorless discs were immediately popular for their durability and feel. They were also helpful for some catching techniques as you could see through the disc. The Jimmies were hot stamped in the center of the discs in five different colors. The colors were: red, yellow, green, blue, and black. Coincidentally, the Olympic games were held in 1976 and the five rings comprising the Olympic symbol were and are officially the same five colors. The black Jimmies are the most highly prized of the translucent tournament series. They are extremely rare and were made officially at only one tournament. The tournament was the Western National Golf Championship in April '76. In order of availability, the red Jimmies were distributed at only two events. The two events were the Big Apple Jam in June and at Rochester in August. Green Jimmies and yellow Jimmies were both distributed at three events. The green ones appeared at Florence, Chicago and Boulder. The yellow ones sailed at Chicago and Rochester. Blue Jimmies were distributed most freely in range. They were to be found at six different events throughout the season. The tournaments were: Los Angeles in April, Sonoma in May, Octad, Florence, Boulder, and Boston in July.”
Contributor(s): Mike Hughes
OLYMPUS IMAGING CORP. E-M5, f/9 @ 19 mm, 0.3s, ISO 200, No Flash

Wham-O 50 Mold—Black, Gold—Unpigmented